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L'UOMO E LA MONTAGNA

[ the man and the mountain ]

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L'UOMO E LA MONTAGNA

[ the man and the mountain ]

LORENZO VIGNOLI  [ sculptor ]

I was born in one of the valleys of the Apuan Alps. Since I was a small child I learned to respect the mountains and absorbed their profound meaning. My mother instilled in me the sensitivity I have for the beauty of these mountains. My Father taught me to respect them.

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After many years of research and study, traveling from country to country, I have realized how much these mountains meant to me. This is the reason I chose the marble from these mountains to manifest my view of life, and express my creativity. Like the roots of a tree, a sculpture is born from the earth. This forces me to look below the surface, beyond the exterior, into the layers of humus and fossils for the inspiration to realize my vision.

I come from Pietrasanta and Carrara, which are historically the two largest centers for sculpture in Italy. Thanks to the sculpting tradition that is deeply settled in my territory, I had the chance to interact with marble, bronze, ceramics plastic, resins and wood, experimenting and exploring the world of materials and the volumes, from ancient tradition to contemporary design.

I tried to grasp the sculpting tradition as a value and its essence through the centuries of transformation by the work of man trying to recover both part of a tradition, which is disappearing, as well as the contemporary elasticity, in its speed and in its ephemeral sensitivity.

My interest lies in examining the encounter of these two aspects as the meeting point of different materials that prompts me to highlight this aspect, emphasizing the point of contact, a sharp line that divides the materials, a line that divides the world of the past from the one of the future like the gap which is growing larger and larger, splitting a unique essence.

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The goal of the project is to reflect on this clear separation between the past and the future which is growing vigorously, a clear-cut division between what was before and what is now in our relationship with the physicality of life. My attempt is a positive tolerance, an “atomic tolerance” I call it, between the atoms that make up the different materials, it’s a challenge for the future, it’s not only tolerance among the people but also tolerance towards the matter that people transform.

The project consists in creating and studying the space of division, as in the “gap” between the various materials while creating initially a fractured fusion of the various elements which then are successively sculpted, modeled, ripped apart. I try to experience the maximum separation between the material elements, through linear or forced processes.

My final goal is to structure a dialogue between the various pieces through their own partitions, thus creating the final result of a strong and homogenous effect. I’ve been working now for some time at dividing the elements; I started this project three years ago using materials that I was closely accustomed to such as marble, wood, bronze and ceramics, but I’d like to take advantage of this process to deal with the use of other materials, but faster, experimenting the instinctive gesture of the moment creating an actual installation.

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360 VIEW VIDEOS

EMBRIONE by Lorenzo Vignoli [ 360 video ]


MADRE TERRA by Lorenzo Vignoli [ 360 video ]


CONTORTIONISTA by Lorenzo Vignoli [ 360 video ]


See all currently listed marble sculptures by Lorenzo Vignoli here


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UNA VISITA DI STUDIO

[ a studio visit ] 

 


 

UNA VISITA DI STUDIO

[ a studio visit ] 

 

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CAPTURING EPIC SCALE

[ on higher elevation ]


CAPTURING EPIC SCALE

[ on higher elevation ]

FRANK SCHOTT [ photographer ]

Spending time in the remote Apuan Alps earlier this summer, I found myself drawn to the ancient marble quarries on this rugged mountain range's highest elevations, fascinated by the almost brutal industrial scars that are evidence of the impact of modern day marble demand on mountains and nature.

Most quarries have been in continuous use since Ancient Roman times, but the last 50 years have seen an explosion in demand for the famous white marble that surpasses all marble "harvesting" of the preceding 2000 years.

Spending days and nights in solitude high up in these mountains, hiking from quarry to quarry, I came away with an admiration for these grandiose marble quarries where nature met man. I tried to capture their silent beauty void of any sign of life, although on closer inspection each photograph will reveal subtle signs of humanity in the form of a dropped chisel, tire mark or scratched marking - helping to bring the grandness of these quarries into a more imaginable scale.

CARRARA I

48 x 72 inches / 122cm x 183cm [ edition of 7 ]

MARMO di CARRARA

48 x 72 inches / 122cm x 183cm (edition of 7)

CARRARA II

68 x 58 inches / 173cm x 147cm (edition of 7)

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See more of Frank Schott's large-scale photographs here